Positive industry reading matter on the Internet news site The Times Online this weekend included a piece about David Copeland (30), a Scots online gambling recruiting specialist who has built a successful international company and believes that the U.S. Internet gambling market will shed its legal shackles in the future.
 
Four years ago he started a message board called Bettingjobs, growing it into a specialised online gambling commercial recruitment business that employs 25 people in Malta, Singapore and Costa Rica as well as his home in Kilbride, Scotland.
 
Unfortunately, his success is apparently not fully appreciated by Business Gateway, the UK government’s business development agency, whom he approached for backing for further expansion.
 
“I was astonished when it was suggested I should take a 30 percent wage cut to show I was serious,” said Copeland. “Having built the company up to employing 25 people from nothing, it should be obvious that I am already pretty serious about it.
 
The Times Online reports that Copeland was working in recruitment in London when he noticed a potential gap in the market as the number of clients looking to recruit people for the gambling industry began to rise.
 
“Online gambling was about to take off and needed people with specific skills,” he said.
 
The company quickly did well and moved into small premises on Glasgow’s south side. By the end of last year, it needed more space and moved into its East Kilbride HQ. This year Copeland opened small offices in Malta, Singapore and Costa Rica. “Costa Rica is ideal because it is on the same timeline for the major markets of North, South and Central America,” he said.
 
Copeland wants to be on the American continent. He believes the world’s biggest market will open up before too long.
 
“There is a review and pressure to open up the US to online gambling,” said Copeland. Even without the US, there are opportunities for growth.
 
“We’ve grown the business by 100 percent year on year and that is partly because our staff are all very motivated. Most are under 30, so they really understand the niche market.”
 
Copeland sees no signs of a downturn hitting the online market, but he is also looking at other business investments. A keen golfer, he is considering making an investment in a golf training aid, but still thinks his home country could do much more to help people develop businesses.