Tuesday, November 22, 2011 : Relatively unknown company purchased software from Vegas Tech
 
The mysterious arrival of Liberty Slots, which carries familiar Vegas Technology games and a very similar look to an English Harbour operation before that company’s withdrawal from the market  has been intriguing online punters who were spammed by the new site recently.
 
This week some answers surfaced on various message boards when a company representative with the rather exotic name of Dylan Mandrake attempted to settle things down.
 
Mandrake advised that Liberty Slots is the first licensee of a previously unknown software provider titled Wager Gaming Technology, which he claims acquired the software from "the former owners"…Odds On successors Vegas Technology.
 
Details of the deal were not given, and it is unknown whether it involved the transfer of Vegas Tech developers along with the software, or whether WGT has a technical staff of its own.
 
There was also little information on WGT's management or location, there does not appear to be a website, and there were no assurances on the nature of any jurisdictional probity checks the firm has undergone, although Mandrake did reveal that they are to enlist the services of a third party auditor to check the software out.
 
"We [Liberty Slots] are not the owners of the software, but a licensee just like an MGS, Playtech, or RTG licensee would be. We are in no way related to, affiliated with, or in communication with any of the former software owners casino brands," Mandrake wrote.
 
"In regards to the [website] similarities – we are a new group and felt that using a site template would assist in software recognition amongst players. The music in the casino client was provided by the software company."
 
Mandrake explains the targeted email marketing that Liberty Slots has been deploying as the result of enlisting the services of a third party marketing partner.
 
"We did not purchase the lists or have them in our possession, we simply used a partner to market to a target group," says the Liberty Slots rep without identifying the marketing company concerned.
 
His answer is unlikely to placate players annoyed at the apparent disclosure of their details to a new operator and without their permission, inviting accusations of a breach of personal privacy.