Tuesday November 19 ,2013 :  NATIONAL COUNCIL OF LEGISLATORS POISED TO ASSIST LEGALISING U.S. STATES
 
Advice and guidance to be available as more US states look to legalise online gambling.
 
The National Council of Legislators From Gaming States  is poised to offer guidance to US states who decide to take the state-by-state route to online gambling regulation and licensing, according to a press release from the organisation.
 
With more states set to follow the example of Delaware, Nevada and New Jersey, several US states are actively considering the merits of interstate Internet gaming agreements, the NCLGS explains.
 
"In response to state Internet gaming developments and in line with its staunch states’ rights policy, NCLGS is launching efforts to build a much-needed policy framework for states enacting and considering interstate Internet gaming," the body adds, stressing the importance of strong consumer protection and strict oversight.
 
In 2014 NCLGS aims to develop a model set of standards to protect both states that wish to participate in Internet gaming and those who do not, and to foster effective regulation and cooperation among states.
 
NCLGS president and Florida Rep. Jim Waldman will lead the project and says: “In the realm of Internet gaming, multistate cooperation, both nationally and regionally, is necessary to develop economies of scale, protect consumers, and establish uniform guidelines and procedures, while avoiding unnecessary federal intervention as gaming expands on a state-by-state basis.
 
"NCLGS believes that the development of standards will help guide the discussion among all stakeholders on interstate Internet gambling.”
 
Early next year at the NCLGS Winter Meeting in Hollywood, Florida, delegates will hear from industry experts, problem gaming specialists, and regulators on issues related to Internet gaming and interstate compacts.
 
Issues to be considered will include problem gaming protections, privacy standards, dispute resolution mechanisms, taxation rates, revenue distribution models, regulatory models, technological requirements, and liability issues.