Saturday August 20,2011 :  Rentschler calls it a day at FTP associate Pocket Kings
 
The crisis at Full Tilt Poker appears to have claimed another casualty with the resignation this week of Lothar Rentschler, the top marketing manager for parent company Pocket Kings.
 
Rentschler joins a string of employees, including various ‘country' managers, who have left the Dublin, Ireland-based company either voluntarily or as part of restructuring in the wake of Black Friday, many of them finding their way to rival Paddy Power.
 
In an email dated August 16, Rentschler advised a wide audience of his industry contacts:
 
“This was, after almost 3 years with the company, not an easy step… It was 3 years with many challenges and also many successes… However, given the current circumstances, I do believe it is a long overdue step towards the right direction.
 
“I do apologize for the inconvenience the current circumstances at PKL have caused for you personally as well as for your respective companies. Our hands in Marketing were bound and at the end even every communication was stopped. Again, I can only apologize for this situation. The future will hopefully see a better, well organized structure and a return to business as usual. To see the brand FTP going down that way, hurts a lot."
 
Apparently Rentschler's duties at the company will officially end September 13, although given the content of his email it is not outside the bounds of possibility that he may be taking ‘gardening leave'.
 
Given his remark: "….and at the end even every communication was stopped," it is unlikely he will be commenting again in the immediate future.
 
Nothing further has been heard regarding Full Tilt Poker’s negotiations with reportedly European investors who may be interested in the beleaguered company, and as yet there has been no further information on the next hearing by the Alderney Gaming Control Commission on FTP's suspended licence.
 
The Commissioners have undertaken to hold the next hearing no later than September 15 in order to give the negotiators time to make progress "in the best interests of the players."