Tuesday May 29, 2012 : TABCORP QUICK TO SUPPORT AUSSIE REVIEW ON INTERACTIVE GAMBLING ACT (Update)
 
Gambling giant does not appear to relish competition….
 
Australian gambling giant Tabcorp Holdings Limited has been quick to voice an opinion on the federal government's review of the Interactive Gambling Act and the recommendations outlined in the Interim Report released by the Department of Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy (DBCDE).
 
In a public statement, the company said it has long favoured a review because "…the growth of online technologies has meant the Act is not fulfilling its intended purposes. Specifically, a number of gambling operators offer online services to Australian customers in contravention of the Act, without consequence."
 
The statement continues: "Tabcorp reiterates its support for an online gambling framework that creates a level playing field for wagering operators, minimises harm and maintains consumer confidence in the gambling industry.
 
Core to Tabcorp’s position is the creation of a well regulated online gambling environment, with nationally consistent rules which are enforced."
 
The company notes in response to the Interim Report’s findings:
 
• Tabcorp supports efforts to strengthen sanctions against illegal online gambling operators, including the provision of more forceful warnings to consumers. To succeed, these measures will require vigilance by authorities, resourcing from government and regular review to keep pace with technological change. The measures proposed should go some way to ensuring that contravening operators are more likely to comply with the Act’s requirements and are sanctioned when they are breached.
 
• The deregulation of certain online gambling activities, such as live betting on sports events and tournament poker, would enable Australians who wish to participate in such activities to bet with reputable Australian operators, rather than force them to bet with contravening offshore or local operators.
 
• Tabcorp supports the development of national minimum standards for harm minimisation. This would create a framework for the appropriate delivery of online gambling, noting the differences for customer care between online and land-based gambling activity. Standards should address responsible gambling messaging, credit betting, inducements, marketing, self-exclusion and requirements for arrangements with sports controlling bodies.