01/03/2012 : With the DoJ obstacle removed, new opportunities could be opening up
 
In common with other state lotteries, Oregon has a real interest in the recent switch in the US Department of Justice policy regarding online gambling and the Wire Act, and it has lost no time in researching new opportunities.
 
The Oregon Lottery this week announced the formation of an advisory group tasked with studying the industry and developing recommendations to ensure that Oregon is up to speed on new ideas, and that its marketing and responsible gambling activities are appropriate.
 
An experienced responsible gambling executive, Jeff Marotta of Problem Gambling Solutions Incorporated, will lead the advisory initiative, which among others will revisit the shelved ORcade website, which was put on the back burner by Governor John Kitzhaber last year.
 
Other members of Marotta's team include Kathleen Joy, executive director for the Oregon Volunteers Commission for Voluntary Action and Service; Julie Hynes, Lane County Problem Gambling Prevention coordinator; Nicole Corbin, Problem Gambling Service manager for the Oregon Health Authority; and Wendy Hausotter, Public Health and Prevention coordinator for Problem Gambling Services.
 
The group will gather for the first time later this week.
 
Marotta told local media that the team would reconsider the ORcade project to assess whether the Oregon Lottery is intentionally or unintentionally prompting under-aged persons to gamble.
 
"Perhaps more importantly, the Oregon Lottery wants to continue to make responsible gambling an integral part of their daily operations, and as such we are also to review and make recommendations on all relevant aspects of business including employee and retailer training, advertising and marketing and product development,” Marotta said.
 
“Evaluating the Oregon Lottery’s games and marketing approach is consistent with the Oregon Lottery’s longstanding commitment to achieving the Oregon Lottery’s mission of maximising revenue for public purposes commensurate with the public good,” said lottery director Larry Niswender.