Right2Bet, a pressure group which promotes a more open internet gambling market in Europe, has embarked on another initiative in which it is monitoring the odds offered on football World Cup tournament betting, widely expected to produce record levels of wagering activity this time around.
 
The project involves tracking and analysing the odds offered throughout the competition by Europe's monopolies and private competitors, with the expectation that it will show millions of Europeans are “ripped off by the betting monopolies that their governments force them to use.”
 
A Right2Bet statement claims:  “The value they [the players] are offered is significantly inferior to the value offered by the banned (yet licensed elsewhere) competition.
 
“The World Cup report we're in the process of compiling will show succinctly, exactly the type of value a punter was offered, dependent on the services legally available to them.
 
“Monopolies, in Sweden, Holland, Germany and Greece are all being tracked, as are the two ‘former' monopolies in France, the FDJ and the PMU.
 
“The results out of France will be particularly insightful, since they will show whether or not the new French licensing regime has actually worked.”
 
Right2Bet says that it is still early days, but the indications are that gamblers are, on average, some 20 percent worse off betting with state monopolies than would be the case with open competitors.
 
“We hope the report will provide compelling evidence to the Industry and its regulators that change is needed, and we hope that it will show European consumers why signing our petition, and backing the right2bet campaign is so important,” the statement ends.